RE:akt!

Action #10: Il Porto dell’amore

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La Testa di Ferro
Libera vove dei legionari di Fiume



YOGA
Unione di spiriti liberi tendenti alla perfezione



Il ballo di San Vito. Primo quaderno della Yoga. Collezione diretta da Mino Somenzi. Cittá di Vita, Giugno 1920



Il ballo di San Vito. Primo quaderno della Yoga. Collezione diretta da Mino Somenzi. Cittá di Vita, Giugno 1920
 


On the occasion of the ‘St Vitu’s Festival’ Mino Somenzi published one of the most memorable Futurist documents to be distributed in the streets of Fiume. It was called Il ballo di San Vito. Primo quaderno della Yoga. Collezione diretta da Mino Somenzi. Cittá di Vita, Giugno 1920 and contained an ‘Appeal to the Population of Fiume’, where the citizens were exhorted to join the youthful and vitalistic Ardito-Futurists in their endeavour to demolish the bourgeois establishment, to ‘smash to pieces all altars and pedestals’ and to destroy the power of ‘banks, beards, and prejudices’. The futurist mottos of ‘destroy and create’ and ‘disseminate, overthrow, set to fire’ would inspire the world to make an end to the accepted order and to replace it with a system ‘where everything is possible in an atmosphere of geniality and incandescent madness’. The ‘festival as an institution’ was seen as an expression of this ludic principle, and to ‘remove the hundred deliberating sages from their seats of power’ was therefore going to be an ‘intoxicating and tumultuous ball’. Preceding the Appeal is another proclamation, directed to the female section of the population. They are exhorted to become ‘the mother of the modern woman’, to make use of ‘the hour of your awakening and not to fear hypocrisy masquerading as morals’, ‘not to fear the modern ideas that are exploding in the volcanic brains of the “forgers”, who have made Fiume the centre of innovation.’ Until now, ‘woman have only been the fountain of carnal pleasures; in future they will also be a spiritual and heroic stimulant of modern mankind.’ As a step in that direction they are called upon to discard with the romantic notion of woman as a passive creature on whom everything can be imposed. Instead they are asked ‘to have the courage to stand to their femininity and their own desires.’ They have their mission just like man; but to achieve this aim they have to liberate themselves from old prejudices and ‘putrid morality’.

(Excerpted from Günter Berghaus, Futurism and Politics: Between Anarchist Rebellion and Fascist Reaction, 1909-1944, Oxford, Berghahn Books, 1995; pp. 140-141).






INDEX

Introduction [HTML]

The “Celebration City” [HTML]
Free Love and Artificial Paradises [HTML]
The “Desperados” [HTML]
International acknowledgement [HTML]
Pirate Economy [HTML]
Publishing [HTML]
The Charter of Carnaro [HTML]
The Labarum [HTML]
The League of Fiume [HTML]
Bloody Christmas [HTML]
Protagonists [HTML]